Artspace

Pip Culbert

Seams

July 1 - August 27, 2016
Opening Friday July 1, 6pm

Public Programme 

Pip CulbertPip Culbert, Black, open top, Black, with button, 2012. Fabric, cotton Courtesy of Hopkinson Mossman. 

 

 

Pip Culbert’s exhibition takes its title from the central motif in the artist's practice: seams. Deconstructing clothes, bags, tents, and other textile based objects, gleaned by the artist over time, main structural lines of these forms remain. Objects are transformed into conceptual ‘ghosts’, the forms are reduced to archetypes. Just as a chair is not merely a chair for Joseph Kosuth, and a pipe is not just a pipe for René Magritte; these are not only skirts, pockets, bags, they are much more.

 

Like strong shadows or characteristic silhouettes, Culbert's works appear as both painterly and sculptural forms. Seams hold different layers of fabric together with stitches, and Culbert follows their tracks to achieve her ‘soft’ sculptures. Culbert reverses the process of any tailor, or machine; there is a modesty and economy of form - it is a process of relief. Drawing from a range of works dated 1992 to 2014, the exhibition celebrates the subtle nuances of Culbert’s practice. As a parachute bomber sits on a wall rather innocuously opposite Culbert’s re-purposed pocket seams one can detect within these works the current political demands our world is facing; from war, political conflict, poverty and austerity; all of which will shape our future.

 

Pip Culbert (1938—2016) lived and worked in London and the South of France. Culbert’s deconstructed fabric objects have been stripped down to their essential seams. In this exercise of recontextualising the everyday, items are reduced to their bare bones through a process of subtractive drawing that renders three-dimensional objects two-dimensional. 
 
Recent solo exhibitions of Culbert’s work include Grundriß, Gitte Weise Galerie, Berlin, Germany (2009); Flag, Gitte Weise Galerie, Berlin, Germany (2007); Pip Culbert, 64zero3, Christchurch, New Zealand (2006), Pinnies, Dunedin Public Art Gallery, Dunedin, New Zealand (2005), fadenschein, Gitte Weise Gallery, Berlin, Germany (2004); Linen Line, SoFa Gallery, Christchurch, New Zealand (2004). Recent group exhibitions include Un sport est un geste, une régle, un enjeu, HorsJeux, Beauvais, France (2009); Flag, Poppy and Pierre Salinger Foundation, Le Thor, France (2008); ULTRAMart, Contemporary Art from New Zealand, Casa-Museo Benwinre, Valencia, Spain (2007); Prospect 2007: New Art New Zealand, City Gallery Wellington, New Zealand (2006).
 
Solo presentations from Chen Chieh-jenPip Culbert and Sabelo Mlangeni take place within the framework of “Singular Pluralities ∞ Plural Singularities”, a series of solo exhibitions which began in 2015. Focusing on artistic research and exhibition methodology, the series experiments with installation strategies, and event structures. Through the three parallel exhibitions Artspace will explore studio processes and artistic approaches in conversation with the audience. 

The exhibition is produced in collaboration with Pip Culbert Estate and Hopkinson Mossman to mark the passing of the artist in February this year.

DOWNLOAD WORKS LIST AND ACCOMPANYING TEXT BY CHISTINA BARTON 

Public Programme

 
Friday July 1, 6:30pm:
Introduction speech by Misal Adnan Yıldız and visiting artist Sabelo Mlangeni
 
Saturday July 2
12pm: SO WHERE DOES PIP CULBERT FIT?
Christina Barton and Peter Robinson discuss the practice of Pip Culbert, moderated by Danae Mossman
 
(break)
 
2pm: POLITICS OF REPRESENTATION / POLITICS OF IMAGES
John Mutambu and Misal Adnan Yıldız in conversation with Sabelo Mlangeni
 
Wednesday August 3
A critical voice from Taipei: CURATORIAL RESEARCH & INSTITUTIONAL PROGRAMMING
Esther Lu, Director of Taipei Contemporary Art Center TCAC in conversation with Misal Adnan Yıldız
 
August 4
Workshop with Chen Chieh-jen. Registrations are now closed.
 
August 5, 6pm
Public Lecture By Chen Chieh-jen 
THE STORY OF LOSHENG SANATORIUM AND 
MAKING OF REALM OF REVERBERATIONS
 
Thank you to The Chartwell Trust for supporting this project.